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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

2 edition of Special occupational hazard review for benzidene-based dyes found in the catalog.

Special occupational hazard review for benzidene-based dyes

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

Special occupational hazard review for benzidene-based dyes

by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

  • 222 Want to read
  • 9 Currently reading

Published by Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, for sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. Govt. Print. Off. in [Cincinnati, Ohio], Washington .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Benzidine dyes -- Safety measures,
  • Dyes and dyeing -- Safety measures

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesDHEW publication ; no. (NIOSH) 80-109, DHEW publication -- no. (NIOSH) 80-109
    The Physical Object
    Paginationv, 60 p. :
    Number of Pages60
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14211197M

    Dyes Derived from Benzidine and Its Congeners. I. Overview. This Action Plan addresses the use of benzidine-based dyes and benzidine congener-based dyes, both metalized and non-metalized, in products that would result in consumer exposure, such as for use to color textiles. There is a well-established concern for the potential. During use of benzidine-based dyes, the greatest potential for exposure would be expected to be among dye-weighers who handle dry powders. / Benzidine -based dyes/ NIOSH; Special Occupational Hazard Review for Benzidine-Based Dyes p ().

      Occupational Hazards review at Hampstead Theatre, London – ‘patchy and pedestrian’ Henry Lloyd-Hughes and Silas Carson in Occupational Hazards at Hampstead Theatre, London.2/5. benzidine-based dyes in the European Union (CAREX, ; Table ). From the US National Occupational Hazard Survey (–74) it was estimated that workers in 63 occupations (primarily the dye manufacturing, textile dyeing, printing, paper, and leather industries) were potentially exposed to benzidine-based dyes.

    Benzidine (trivial name), also called 1,1'- biphenyl -4,4'-diamine (systematic name), is an organic compound with the formula (C 6 H 4 NH 2) 2. It is an aromatic amine. It is a component of a test for cyanide. Related derivatives are used in the production of dyes. Benzidine has been linked to bladder and pancreatic al formula: C₁₂H₁₂N₂.   Development of an Analytical Method for Benzidine-Based Dyes, Chemical Hazards in the Workplace Measurement and Control, ACS Symposium Series , American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, (). Special Occupational Hazard Review for Benzidine-Based Dyes, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Publ. (NIOSH) ().


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Special occupational hazard review for benzidene-based dyes by National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Download PDF EPUB FB2

The intent of a Special Hazard Review is to analyze and document, from a health standpoint, the problems associated with a given industrial chemical, process, or physical agent.

Special Occupational Hazard Review for Benzidine-Based Dyes Cdc-pdf[PDF – 2, KB]. Get this from a library. Special occupational hazard review for benzidine-based dyes. [National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.]. Research has indicated that some of the dyes have induced tumors in animals; occupational exposure to benzidine based dye is related to an increased incidence of bladder cancer in workers; the dyes are metabolized in animals to the carcinogen benzidine; and the enzyme azoreductase, which breaks down these dyes to benzidine, is present in animals and humans.

SPECIAL OCCUPATIONAL HAZARD REVIEW for BENZIDINE-BASED DYES U. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND WELFARE Public Health Service Center for Disease Control National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health JANUARY For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S.

Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C. Cited by: Special Hazard Review of Benzidine-Based Dyes, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, October, Special occupational hazard review for benzidine-based dyes.

occupational exposure to benzidine based dye is related to an increased incidence of bladder cancer in workers; the dyes are metabolized in animals to the carcinogen benzidine; and the enzyme azoreductase, which breaks down these dyes to benzidine, is present in animals and.

From the US National Occupational Hazard Survey (–74) it was estimated that workers in 63 occupations (primarily the dye manufacturing, textile dyeing, printing, paper, and leather industries) were potentially exposed to benzidine-based dyes (NIOSH, ).

A decade later, estimates from another US National Occupational Exposure Survey (–83) indicated that about. Health Hazard Alert -- Benzidine- o-Tolidine- and o-Dianisidine- Based Dyes. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Publication No.

(December ). Review of data concluding the potential of these dyes to cause cancer in humans. Concern about the concen- tration of residual benzidine in the finished dye is due to the general recognition of benzidine and its salts as human carcinogens.

Occupational exposure to them has been established as a cause of cancer of the bladder [1]. Recent increases in the importation of benzidine-based dyes Cited by: 5.

Lloyd-Hughes as Stewart and Silas Carson as Karim Mahood in Occupational Hazards. Photograph: Marc Brenner Such is the helter-skelter rush of Author: Michael Billington. Benzidine derived dyes, pp.

10 U.S. Dept. of Health, Education and Welfare, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Publication No. (), Special occupational hazard review of benzidine-based dyes, 60 pp. 11 M. Boeniger, Carcinogenicity and metabolism of azo dyes, especially those derived from benzidine, U.S Cited by: and dyes metabolized to benzidine, which are listed (separately) as known to be human carcinogens, follow this introduction.

Benzidine CAS No. Known to be a human carcinogen First listed in the First Annual Report on Carcinogens () Also known as 4,4′-diaminobiphenyl H2N NH2 Carcinogenicity Benzidine is known to be a human carcinogen based on sufficient ev-File Size: KB. Occupational Hazards by Rory Stewart pp, Picador, £ Rory Stewart clearly thrives on adventure.

After a period as an infantry officer, Author: David Morphet. Research has indicated that some of the dyes have induced tumors in animals; occupational exposure to benzidine based dye is related to an increased incidence of bladder cancer in workers; the dyes are metabolized in animals to the carcinogen benzidine; and the enzyme azoreductase, which breaks down these dyes to benzidine, is present in animals and by: Learn about benzidine, exposure to which raises your risk of bladder cancer.

Benzidine is a manufactured chemical. In the past, benzidine was used to produce dyes or products used in clinical laboratories. However, benzidine has not been sold in the United States since the mids. Author(s): National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health.

Title(s): Special occupational hazard review for benzidine-based dyes. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Cincinnati, Ohio: U.S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Public Health Service, Center for Disease Control, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ; Washington, D.C.

NIOSH; Special Occupational Hazard Review for Benzidine-Based Dyes p () HSDB Humans as well as other mammals can change (metabolize) /some/ benzidine -based dyes back to benzidine. NIOSH: Special Occupational Hazard Review for Benzidine-based Dyes.

DHEW Publ. January, Cited by: 9. Appendix G lists benzidine-based dyes reported to be commercially available in the United States in the late s. These appendices are reprinted from the NIOSH Special Hazard Review ofBenzidine-Based Dyes (NIOSH, ).

4File Size: 8MB. Review of Occupational Hazards Associated With Aquaculture Article Literature Review (PDF Available) in Journal of Agromedicine 15(4) October with. Examples of benzidine-based dyes are Direct Blue 6, Direct Brown 9, Direct Bl etc.

The production of benzidine-based dyes has significantly decreased during the last : King-Thom Chung.Buy Occupational Hazards: My Time Governing in Iraq Reprints by Stewart, Rory (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders/5(67).A third problem was the development of analytical techniques specific to three benzidine-based dyes. “Stop gap” analytical methods were developed utilising pairedion chromatography and separation by high performance liquid chromatography for C.I.

Direct Blue 6, C.I. Direct Bl and C.I. Direct Brown Author: R. H. Bell, G. R. Schultz, L. F. Sefton.